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The Philippines Goverment has become the latest target in the #antisec operation with a hacker crew known by BashCrew, Congress.gov.ph being hacked and having some data leaked.

Several hacker groups have mounted a fresh batch of cyber attacks against the Philippines, Peruvian, and Colombian governments, all in the name of Anonymous’ ongoing AntiSec campaign.

The attacks were all first revealed on The Hacker News website before subsequently being publicised by Anonymous via one of its Twitter accounts


 
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This one is funny or for some, insulting.

AntiSec, a "hacktivism" partnership between Anonymous and former LulzSec members, released over 90,000 emails lifted from Booz Allen Hamilton's servers on Monday. The military contractor stayed quiet for most of the day, only to tweet vaguely in the late afternoon, "As part of @BoozAllen security policy, we generally do not comment on specific threats or actions taken against our systems."

They did not include word on whether they would be offering further response to one of the kind of novel part of the attack: Anonymous included an invoice for hacking the consulting firm:


 
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Shortly after the hackers with the AntiSec online activist campaign announced the release of about 90,000 military e-mail addresses and other data purloined from Booz Allen Hamilton, AntiSec followers on Twitter were anticipating a second data dump.

The Twitter account of someone believed to be a main operative in the AntiSec hacking campaigns, AnonymouSabu, warned on Sunday: "ATTN: Tomorrow will be two of the biggest releases for Anonymous in the last 4 years. Everyone brace. This is literally explosive."


 
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A group of hackers who have taken credit for several high-profile data breaches in recent weeks said Monday it had done it again, this time infiltrating the network of a government contractor and releasing what it says are thousands of military email addresses.

Calling the hack "Military Meltdown Monday," the hacker group claimed to have penetrated a computer server of Booz Allen Hamilton and released a list of more than 90,000 military email addresses and encrypted passwords and deleted 4 GB of source code.


 
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Hacker groups that attack or steal -- some estimates say there are as many as 6000 of such groups online with about 50,000 "bad actors" around the world drifting in and out of them -- are a threat, but the goals, methods, effectiveness of these groups varies widely.

Malicious activity alert: Anonymous hack-school grads come online in 30 days

When they're angry, they hack into business and government systems to steal confidential data in order to expose information about their targets, or they simply disrupt them with denial-of-service attacks. These are the hackers with a cause, the "hacktivists" like the shadowy but well-publicized Anonymous or the short-lived Lulz Security group (which claimed to have just six members and just joined forces with Anonymous).


 
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The recent compromise of a NATO server by “Team Inj3ct0r” has recently made the news, but, as the media usually do, they did not look any deeper than the website for Inj3ct0r and perhaps a little data as to what the team said in a text doc on the compromised server.

A further examination of the group shows that Inj3ctor has been around since 2008, and has ties to Chinese hackers as well as Russia, Turkey and other countries.


 
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Now that the Lulzboat has run aground during its three hour tour, and the rats have gone overboard in search of the relative safety of a pineapple under the sea, the computer media continues with the personal soap operas of "Anonymous" and "AntiSec" with the kids engaged in their infighting, whereas the attention of security people returns once again to the larger, more serious issues that involve the client side of the world.

When we last left our heroes, Microsoft had announced the takedown of a major botnet known as "Rustock." Well... not a complete takedown of course, but it's dwindled a bit aseWeek reports. Rustock had a good run before it was wrestled to the ground (almost) given that it first appeared in 2006.

A mere five year half life for malware is considered perfectly acceptable these days in the computer security realm.


 
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It was early May when LulzSec's profile skyrocketed after a hack on the giant Sony corporation. LulzSec's name comes from Lulz, a corruption of LOL, often denoting laughter at the victim of a prank. For 50 days until it disbanded, the group's unique blend of humour, taunting and unapologetic data theft made it notorious. But knowing whether LulzSec was all about the "lulz" or if it owed more to its roots as part of Anonymous – the umbrella group of internet subculture and digital activism – was pure speculation. Until now.


 
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In about a month the first graduates of the new Anonymous hacking school could start having an impact on the frequency of cybercrime.

"You could have a quarter of a million people who could be educated on how to hack, not professionally, but enough to be significant," says Karim Hijazi, CEO of security start-up Unveillance. He bases that projected impact on the number of followers that the hacking group LulzSec acquired on Twitter during its 50-day spree -- 285,550. When LulzSec disbanded last week, its members announced formation of the school.


 
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Despite countless WikiLeaks copycats popping up since the secret-spilling site first dumped its cache of State Department cables last year, the new generation of leaking sites has produced few WikiLeaks-sized scoops. So instead of waiting for insider whistleblowers, the hacker movement Anonymous hopes that a few outside intruders might start the leaks flowing.

Earlier this week members of the hacker collective, and specifically a sub-group known as the People’s Liberation Front, (PLF) launched two new leaking sites, LocalLeaks.tk (not to be confused with the similarly named Localeaks.com) and HackerLeaks.tk. Both hope to receive documents through an anonymous submissions channel, analyze them, and then distribute them to the press to get “maximum exposure and political impact.”