Think Information. Think Security.
 
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This one is funny or for some, insulting.

AntiSec, a "hacktivism" partnership between Anonymous and former LulzSec members, released over 90,000 emails lifted from Booz Allen Hamilton's servers on Monday. The military contractor stayed quiet for most of the day, only to tweet vaguely in the late afternoon, "As part of @BoozAllen security policy, we generally do not comment on specific threats or actions taken against our systems."

They did not include word on whether they would be offering further response to one of the kind of novel part of the attack: Anonymous included an invoice for hacking the consulting firm:


 
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Shortly after the hackers with the AntiSec online activist campaign announced the release of about 90,000 military e-mail addresses and other data purloined from Booz Allen Hamilton, AntiSec followers on Twitter were anticipating a second data dump.

The Twitter account of someone believed to be a main operative in the AntiSec hacking campaigns, AnonymouSabu, warned on Sunday: "ATTN: Tomorrow will be two of the biggest releases for Anonymous in the last 4 years. Everyone brace. This is literally explosive."


 
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A group of hackers who have taken credit for several high-profile data breaches in recent weeks said Monday it had done it again, this time infiltrating the network of a government contractor and releasing what it says are thousands of military email addresses.

Calling the hack "Military Meltdown Monday," the hacker group claimed to have penetrated a computer server of Booz Allen Hamilton and released a list of more than 90,000 military email addresses and encrypted passwords and deleted 4 GB of source code.


 
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Now that the Lulzboat has run aground during its three hour tour, and the rats have gone overboard in search of the relative safety of a pineapple under the sea, the computer media continues with the personal soap operas of "Anonymous" and "AntiSec" with the kids engaged in their infighting, whereas the attention of security people returns once again to the larger, more serious issues that involve the client side of the world.

When we last left our heroes, Microsoft had announced the takedown of a major botnet known as "Rustock." Well... not a complete takedown of course, but it's dwindled a bit aseWeek reports. Rustock had a good run before it was wrestled to the ground (almost) given that it first appeared in 2006.

A mere five year half life for malware is considered perfectly acceptable these days in the computer security realm.


 
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With an online warning that they are picking up where hackers LulzSec left off, a new group calling itself AntiSec has released a large torrent of hacked data via the Pirate Bay's servers including:
  • A "Universal Music Group Partners dump 1 & 2 containing umusic.com's user:passwords and other data"
  • A "Viacom dump containing internal mapping of Viacom and its server:There has been no comment yet form Universal on the extend or exact nature of the shared data. Here is the full AntiSec statement: