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 The “Operation Chinga La Migra”, which means “F*** the border patrol.”  may be the last of the LulzSec hacking campaign.

LulzSec have recently announced that they are disbanding. 

The group have suffered a doze of their own medicine from some hacking groups that are against them, and have exposed their identities.

The leaked logs from LulzSec's private chatroom – seen, and published by the Guardian – provide for the first time a unique, fly-on-the-wall insight into a team of audacious young hackers whose inner workings have until now remained opaque.

LulzSec is not, despite its braggadocio, a large – or even coherent – organisation. The logs reveal how one hacker known as "Sabu", believed to be a 30-year-old security consultant, effectively controls the group of between six and eight people, keeping the others in line and warning them not to discuss what they have done with others; another, "Kayla", provides a large botnet – networks of infected computers controlled remotely – to bring down targeted websites with distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks; while a third, "Topiary", manages the public image, including the LulzSec Twitter feed.

They turn out to be obsessed with their coverage in the media, especially in physical newspapers, sharing pictures of coverage they have received in the Wall Street Journal and other papers. They also engineered a misinformation campaign to make people think they are a US-government sponsored team.

They also express their enmity towards a rival called The Jester – an ex-US military hacker who usually attacks jihadist sites, but has become embroiled in a dispute with Anonymous, WikiLeaks and LulzSec over the leaked diplomatic cables and, more recently, LulzSec's attacks on US government websites, including those of the CIA and the US Senate.

In a further sign that the spotlight is beginning to engulf LulzSec, a lone-wolf hacker managed to temporarily cripple the group's website on Friday morning. Originally thought to be the work of The Jester, an activist, known as Oneiroi, later claimed responsibility for the attack but did not provide an explanation.

The group's ambitions went too far for some of its members: when the group hit an FBI-affiliated site on 3 June, two lost their nerve and quit, fearing reprisals from the US government. After revealing that the two, "recursion" and "devrandom" have quit, saying they were "not up for the heat", Sabu tells the remaining members: "You realise we smacked the FBI today. This means everyone in here must remain extremely secure.

You can view the LulzSec IRC Leak from here.

As their ambition and media limelight might be too much for them to handle anymore, the group claims that it intended to only operate for 50 days as an attempt to revive the AntiSec movement, which is opposed to the computer security industry.

“For the past 50 days we’ve been disrupting and exposing corporations, governments, often the general population itself, and quite possibly everything in between, just because we could,” the hacker group said in its announcement. “All to selflessly entertain others – vanity, fame, recognition, all of these things are shadowed by our desire for that which we all love.”

The release continues on, explaining that the organization is not tied to its LulzSec identity and has succeeded in bringing back the AntiSec movement. The group, in fact, encourages others to take up its cause. “We hope, wish, even beg, that the movement manifests itself into a revolution that can continue on without us… Together, united, we can stomp down our common oppressors and imbue ourselves with the power and freedom we deserve.”

As its final parting gift, the group released one last data dump with data allegedly taken from AT&T, AOL, Disney, Universal, EMI and the FBI.

The group has had its way with corporations and governments for the last two months. It took down the CIA’s websitehacked Sony’s servers, released sensitive documents from the Arizona state government andattacked the U.S. Senate’s website. While a suspected member of LulzSec was recently apprehended, the group claims he was not its leader.

The end of LulzSec doesn’t mean the end of hacker attacks, of course. Long-standing hacker group Anonymous is still around, and we bet other groups will form in the wake of the group’s disbandment. And with 277,000+ followers and a captivated audience, we bet LulzSec will come back in one form or another. We also doubt its disbandment will stop authorities from searching for its masterminds.

Sources: GuardianMashable, Nerd Reactor



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